Monthly Archives

August 2018

Furry Friends at Wake Robin

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Walking along the paths and neighborhoods at Wake Robin, one cannot help but run into a friendly four-legged friend. The Wake Robin  community has always been pet friendly. All furry or feathered companions are welcome!

Mojo pauses for a picture.

 

There are many activities at Wake Robin that are dog friendly. Dogs are welcomed to cruise along the over four miles of walking trails, accompany a resident collecting their mail inside the community center (except during meal times), or visit a friend living in Linden. The front desk is always equipped with an assortment of dog treats and pats from staff members. There are dog waste containers located around Wake Robin for convenience and even a dog park located right on campus.

When a resident’s needs increase and they are thinking of moving into the Linden Health Center, there is a worry of – what happens to my furry companion? Residents can choose to move their feline or canine friends into their new homes in Linden with them. If they are still able to care for them, they are welcome! There was even a guinea pig that lived in Linden for a period of time!

A resident and her dog, Sadie, going for a walk along the trails.

Wake Robin is an active community with residents that are walking, hiking, swimming, kayaking, or just enjoying the outdoors. This might be one of the reasons that there are so many dogs spotted walking around the community.

According to a study published in Scientific Reports, people who live alone and own dogs are more likely to live a longer life. Maybe Wake Robin is on to something!

Just to note, there are many feline companions that call Wake Robin home. Cats are not as seen and heard, since all cats live inside. While they are not mentioned as much in this blog – There are 25 cats that live here at Wake Robin that are just as loved as their canine counterparts!

 

How Seniors Can Safely Stay Active, Even in Extreme Heat

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Article By Katie Rosenbrock

(Originally posted August 4, 2015 in The Active Times)

From swimming in your backyard pool to enjoying long evening bike rides, there are so many things to love about summer. But one downside to the season that we don’t discuss often is the increased risk for heat-related illnesses that comes along with extreme summer heat.

Everyone should be aware of the dangers, but Linda Phypers, R.N., L.N.H.A., director of health services at Wake Robin, Vermont’s first Continuing Care Retirement Community, says the elderly community should take extra precautions.

“High heat and humidity can be dangerous—and people may feel differently on different days regardless of what the thermometer reads,” Phypers explained.

When it comes to engaging in physical activity on hot and humid days, she suggests choosing cooler times of the day, like in the early morning or late evening, or if it’s really a scorcher, opting not to exercise at all that day.

What should seniors be most concerned about when it comes to staying active in the summer?

“Dehydration and overexertion,” Phypers said. “Take extra breaks, remove gear and clothing to let the body cool down. Drink lots of water and give your body extra time to recover after exercise in extreme heat — the body gets overexerted and fatigued more quickly in high temps.”

She also suggests exercising with a friend so you can keep an eye on each other and said that these tips apply not just to seniors, but really anyone who wants to be active when it’s unusually hot and humid.

But what if it’s really just too hot outside and you want to fit some form of activity into your day?

Phypers suggests making use of an indoor pool if you have access to one.

“The number one indoor activity — if you have access — is to use an indoor pool,” she said. “ [It’s a] great way to get a good workout while keeping the body temperature down.”

If you don’t have a pool, Phypers suggests exercising inside where there are fans or AC.

“Do gentle resistance exercises with free weights or resistance bands,” she explained. “There are lots of free videos on YouTube focused on active seniors. Local fitness centers and senior centers have training and exercise programs indoors. Try yoga or tai chi. These are excellent activities in any weather. They build muscle, improve flexibility and improve balance — all important as we age. There are lots of videos for these exercises, too.”

Also, you could reach out to local senior centers. Phypers said they often plan activities to accommodate summer weather and usually have AC.

Her final piece of advice: if you take any medications, be aware of their side effects.

“Sometimes older people are taking medications that make them more susceptible to the heat — and make it harder to stay hydrated,” Phypers said. “Seniors should be aware if this is the case for them and either avoid strenuous exercise in the heat and take extra measures to stay hydrated.”

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